My Shingle

Rooting for GAL

by Carolyn Elefant on June 28, 2006 · 2 comments

in Ethics & Malpractice Issues, Leaving A Firm

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It’s one thing to write about the  ethics rules relating to leaving a law firm, as I did at this post.  But the way that a law firm should treat a departing attorney and shared clients in theory and the way that things actually work in practice are often entirely different realities, as this post by Greatest American Lawyer demonstrates.  GAL’s post reports that he’s been sued by his former firm over fees associated with a matter that GAL handled at his former firm.  The firm initially tried to steal the case when GAL left the firm by inaccurately advising the client that she had no option but to use a new lawyer from the firm.  The ethics rules require that firms and departing lawyers advise clients of their right to select which attorney to use.

For more details on the status of the claim and on GAL’s view on how it should be resolved, take a look at the post.  GAL, we’re rooting for you!

  • http://www.greatestamericanlawyer.com GAL

    Thanks Caroline for the cheer from the sidelines. I’ll need it. Bib boss will rally his troops by telling them that I am stealing from their children (one of his favorite motivational tools). If I win, the fee will go to pay attorney fees then to the clients.
    I will be posting the briefs next week. They lay out what the lawyer obligations are, the ethics rules involved and the danger of breaching your duties to the client. Not only can you get reported to the discipline board, but (gasp), you can lose your equitable claim to quantum meruit fees as well.

  • http://www.greatestamericanlawyer.com GAL

    Thanks Caroline for the cheer from the sidelines. I’ll need it. Bib boss will rally his troops by telling them that I am stealing from their children (one of his favorite motivational tools). If I win, the fee will go to pay attorney fees then to the clients.
    I will be posting the briefs next week. They lay out what the lawyer obligations are, the ethics rules involved and the danger of breaching your duties to the client. Not only can you get reported to the discipline board, but (gasp), you can lose your equitable claim to quantum meruit fees as well.

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