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Solo & Small Law Firms

Archive for March 2015

What Makes A Great Client?

Tales about  clients from hell abound. Visit any lawyer listserve and you’ll encounter weekly threads populated with complaints about crazy clients or advice on how to fire them. Bad clients aren’t exclusive to the legal profession either – doctors deal with them and one designer even set up a Clients from Hell website dedicated to them.…

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Your Law Firm As a Family Business

Back in the day, farmers always hoped for at least one son who could provide free labor to keep the farm running. Likewise, today’s lawyers can also ask their children — or other family members — to lend a hand in the family business. I’ll confess that I’ve done so on more than one occasion.…

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Does An Ethics Rule Requiring Technologic Competence Mean Much?

Do as we say, not as we do. That’s the message that the regulators send, as they fall in lock step behind the ABA in adopting the ABA Model Code’s rule requiring lawyers to keep abreast of the benefits and risks of technology, as reported by Bob Ambrogi at Law Sites. According to Bob, thirteen…

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Women Lag At BigLaw But Lead As Solos

Only in the twisted hierarchical legal profession would an increase in the number of women as counsel and staff lawyers be viewed as cause for celebration. Yet according to this Law 360 article, “industry experts are applauding the fact that 40 percent of non-partner and associate roles at law firms are now occupied by women…

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Open Your Own Academy

Though it’s usually the other way around, every so often, solos and smalls can take a lesson from big law initiatives. Two months ago, I blogged about Holland and Knight’s security lab, where the firm tests its clients’ systems for security flaws and recommends fixes for vulnerabilities – and now, I’ve just come across The…

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Sponsored Content

7 Ways Practice Management will Help You Get a Head Start in 2018

When you’re able to accomplish more in less time, everyone wins. Your clients will get more for each billable hour they invest in you, and you’ll make more money. A lot more. Consider this: If a lawyer, who charges $365 an hour (the median rate for a consumer law attorney[1]), bills one extra hour per week, they will earn an additional $18,980 annually.