Why Do Experienced Women Lawyers Leave Biglaw? Why Do We Care?

Yesterday, the ABA released a report entitled Walking Out the Door: The Facts, Figures and Future of Experienced Women Lawyers in Private Practice.  Focused on the perspective of women with 15 years or more experience in the nation’s 350 largest firms, the report seeks to answer the question “why do experienced women lawyers leave biglaw.”…

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Women Lag At BigLaw But Lead As Solos

Only in the twisted hierarchical legal profession would an increase in the number of women as counsel and staff lawyers be viewed as cause for celebration. Yet according to this Law 360 article, “industry experts are applauding the fact that 40 percent of non-partner and associate roles at law firms are now occupied by women…

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Women Lawyers Now Biglaw Managing Partners. And we care because…?

Today’s Wall Street Journal reports that two major law firms, BryanCave and MorganLewis each named women as managing partners, a first for both firms. So now, in the words of Therese Pritchard, Bryan Cave’s new managing partner, “younger women think that they can do it too.” Yet is big law partnership what younger women want? …

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Are Women Fighting for Equality At Biglaw Behind the Times?

I was looking through some of these relatively new books on getting ahead in business and entrepreneurship that Marci Alboher reviewed in her Careers Column for the NY Times. (If you recall, I reviewed Marci’s book, One Person, Multiple Careers back here in February). What struck me about these three books – Anti 9 to…

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Women Not Just Leaving Biglaw for Babies, But For More Opportunity

Susan Cartier Liebel posts about how Gen Y women are saying no to biglaw because it doesn’t afford the kind of work life balance they demand.  I’ve posted on and written about this theme before, as well.  But what I don’t think I’ve emphasized sufficiently is that for women, starting a firm isn’t just a…

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Biglaw is Designed By Men, For Men…So Why Not Start Your Own Firm?

Thirty-five year old sprinter Allyson Felix is the most decorated Olympian in track and field history.  Yet even Felix couldn’t outrun discrimination by her former sponsor Nike — which pressured her to return to form as soon as possible after a high-risk pregnancy and birth while slashing her pay to 70 percent of what she’d…

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