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Solos Take on the World!

by Carolyn Elefant on April 3, 2011 · 0 comments

in Big Law/Small Law, Practice Areas, Profiles

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If you think that global practice is the exclusive domain of behemoth law firms, think again. These days, there’s more opportunities for solos to go global than ever before, as I write in my piece, at The Xemplar, entitledA Whole New World for Solos that begins like this:

While many large, national U.S. firms are struggling in the international arena – due to competition with global firms with substantial overseas presence or loss of once-lucrative document review projects to off-shoring, nimble solos – like this month’s Xemplar, Susan Burke – are well positioned to capitalize on the wide array of option’s that today’s brave new world has to offer. In this piece, I’ll identify some of the global opportunities on the horizon for solo and small firm lawyers, and more importantly, what you need to do to take advantage of them.
I. International Trends

Several reasons explain why the iron is hot for solos to crack international markets. First, as a result of international crises and a downward economy, more United States citizens are spending time out of the country than ever before. Peacetime military deployment overseas is at one of its all time highs, while the idea of retiring outside of the country, to stretch retirement savings farther is gaining popularity. Likewise, in the face of rising healthcare costs, many U.S. residents are traveling overseas for affordable procedures ranging from cancer treatment to IVF. Cultural attitudes are changing as well. No longer aspiring to a 30 year career in a corporation, today’s younger generations are far more transient and more likely to sample working abroad…. read more

Of course, if my piece isn’t enough to convince you of global opportunities, then check out my colleague, Niki Black’s profile of the inspirational Susan Burke, a small firm lawyer who’s representing Iraqi victims in the Abu Ghraib torture cases among other major matters.

Do you have a global practice – either representing foreign nationals here in the US, or representing clients overseas? Share your story in the comments below.

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