My Shingle

Legal Ethics of Cloud Computing

by Carolyn Elefant on April 9, 2010 · 4 comments

in Cloud Technology, Ethics & Malpractice Issues, Law Practice Management

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Notwithstanding a work deadline and my still outstanding taxes, I’ve done my part to express my views on cloud computing in response to the North Carolina Ethics Committee Inquiry.  I’m not a member of the North Carolina Bar, but as a frequent commentator on solo and small firm practice, I felt it was important to share my views on these technologies.  As I build this site out, I’d like to serve a resource to ensure that ethics committees make sound decisions that do not adversely impact solo and small firm lawyers or our clients.  So if there are ethics matters where you’d like commentary from MyShingle, please contact me.

Also, please post any comments on the ethics of cloud computing or your views on my letter.  I imagine that the North Carolina Bar will read the comments as it moves forward with its inquiry.


Letter to NC Ethics Committee Re: Cloud Computing

  • http://www.sangambayard-c-m.com jamesd

    Opportunity to Learn
    Just as I can point to lack on joy and motivation, I can point to adult learners that preferred to be guided. I can also point to situations where the instruction did not meet the initial needs articulated by the learners because the instruction itself changed the learner’s and their stated needs………….
    legal education

  • http://www.sangambayard-c-m.com jamesd

    Opportunity to Learn
    Just as I can point to lack on joy and motivation, I can point to adult learners that preferred to be guided. I can also point to situations where the instruction did not meet the initial needs articulated by the learners because the instruction itself changed the learner’s and their stated needs………….
    legal education

  • Pingback: Virtual Law Practice in the News « Virtual Law Practice()

  • http://www.tlclawco.com/blog/category/social-media/ Tsai Law Company

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    Alabama Bar Association Ethics
    Opinion 2010-02 also addresses the ethical implications of using cloud
    computing via an online data storage service as well as the ethics of local
    electronic storage of client files.  Specifically, “Bars of Arizona
    and Nevada recognize that just as with traditional storage and retention of
    client files, a lawyer cannot guarantee that client confidentiality will never
    be breached, whether by an employee or some other third-party. Rather, both
    Arizona and Nevada adopt the approach that a lawyer only has a duty of reasonable
    care in selecting and entrusting the storage of confidential client data to a
    third-party vendor. The Disciplinary Commission agrees and has determined that
    a lawyer may use “cloud computing” or third-party providers to store client
    data provided that the attorney exercises reasonable care in doing
    so.”  Philip Tsai will discuss cloud computing and ethical issues at
    the 2011 Family
    Law Section Midyear Meeting and Seminar in Washington.

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