Inspiring, Celebrating & Empowering
Solo & Small Law Firms

A Renaissance Solo

  • Share this on Google+
  • Share this on Linkedin

I really enjoyed this piece by Mark Donald, An Ode to Okra (Texas Lawyer – 12/1/05, law.com) about Dale Wooten, a Texas bankruptcy solo lawyer, who’s also a “restaurateur, raconteur and gardener.”  Wooten, who’s enjoyed a successful 35 years law practice and generally interesting side businesses, is now winding down a 35 year solo career in large part because of changes in his practice area wrought by the Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Protection Act of 2005.  But because Wooten’s had such a great run, he’s hardly bitter, but instead, looking forward to spending time on his true joys like the garden and restaurant.

After reading the article, I wondered how I’ll leave the practice of
law.  Will I leave content, feeling that I’ve accomplished everything
that I’ve sought out to do?  Will I leave bitter because my practice
failed or a client sued me for malpractice, or regretful and
embarrassed over a grievous error that harms a client?  I don’t know
how much of a choice I’ll have when the time comes, but if I do, I’d
like to go out the same way that Dale Wooten is.

  • cole

    I’m interested in taking an online mediation course. Any comments or ideas as to a certified or recognized course? Thanks!!

  • cole

    I’m interested in taking an online mediation course. Any comments or ideas as to a certified or recognized course? Thanks!!

Sponsored Content

Want to Threaten Big Law? Work in the Cloud

Small firms have never been better positioned to threaten big law and you can thank the cloud.