Inspiring, Celebrating & Empowering
Solo & Small Law Firms

Will be resuming posting shortly

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Readers, I just looked at the date of my last post, and I can’t believe that I’ve gone a week without posting. This is a busy time with work still coming in. And I’m polishing up the final draft of my book which should be out by the end of the year. The book has taken me nearly three years to complete (yes, that’s a little embarrassing, but I have an annoying habit of actually finishing much of what I start…eventually). And even though my words are frozen on the page, the legal profession hasn’t. So now, as I go back over the older material, I’m feeling a little like Heisenberg as I scramble to describe certain topics, only to feel the ground shift as I’m writing.

Once this project is off my plate, there’ll be some changes at MyShingle as well. We’ll be upgrading, big time, getting the Guide up to date and bringing my old archives from December 2002 to November 2004 back online. I’m even hoping to to hire one or two people for the project, so if you’re a student with some time on your hands, a passion for blogs and interested in a little extra cash, feel free to drop me an email here – carolyn.elefant@gmail.com

I am hoping to resume regular posting in the next few days, but until then, you can visit the archives if you’re interested in earlier posts, or read me over at my other beat at Legal Blogwatch. And read the other solo blogs that I mentioned back here, as well as those that have come out since – Susan Cartier Liebel’s How to Build A Practice; Sheryl Sisk Schelin’s Inspired Solo, Solo in Chicago, Chuck Newton, Rick Georges’ Solo Lawyer and Dreams of a Solo. That should keep you busy until my return!

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